Sunday, March 02, 2008

First Umno extremist named by Chinese NGO

The Kuala Lumpur and Selangor Chinese Assembly Hall (KLSCAH) has issued a public statement calling on the voters of the Kulim Bandar Baharu (P.18) parliamentary constituency in Kedah not to support BN candidate Abdul Aziz Sheikh Fadzir for the latter 's role as a leader of an Umno Youth mob that threatened to raze the building of the Hall to the ground and also for screaming anti-Chinese slogans in 2000. Contesting against Abdul Aziz Sheikh Fadzir is PKR's Zulkifli Noordin.

Chinese concern on fuel price hikes, inflation

4 Comments:

Blogger Duran said...

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11:40 AM  
Blogger yapchongyee said...

THE TIGERS THAT LOST THEIR ROAR
The decline of crony capitalism ( Feb./29th)
This is a precise of the book “Asian Godfathers “ by Joe Studwell and I will keep very closely to the text by liberal quotes from the book. I thought of not commenting on this work because the arguments are so close to my own 3 part posts that I had published last week under the title of the “Year Of Change” only my article was written all about Malaysia and this one is all about South East Asia(Asean). You can read the www.economist.com article dated 29th/Feb., from which I had quoted most of it.
The book examines the factors that underpinned the sharp decline of most of the S-E Asian economies, excepting Singapore.“In a recent book, “Asian Godfathers”, Joe Studwell, a journalist, examines this failure in stark terms. The region's business scene, he says, remains dominated by old-fashioned, mediocre, sprawling conglomerates, run at the whims of ageing patriarchal owners. These firms' core competence, such as it is, is exploiting their cosy connections with governing elites. Their profits come from rent-seeking: being handed generous state contracts and concessions, or using their sway with officialdom to keep potential competitors out. If they need technology, they buy it from abroad. As a result, Mr Studwell says, the region has “no indigenous, large-scale companies producing world-class products and services.”
“Corruption is another great burden on business. That is true elsewhere in Asia too, but several South-East Asian countries—notably Indonesia—are afflicted by corrupt and unreliable judicial systems, making it difficult to enforce contracts.” I had written many, many posts (83 posts on my own blog. http://yap.chongyee.blogspot.com) setting out in detail how Judge Zainon binti Mohd. Ali had corruptly and incompetantly struck out my wife’s petition. The judge forced the complicity of my wife’s counsel Mr David Hoh of M/s Lim & Hoh of Jln. Bukit Bintang, KL to render my wife’s petition, COMMATOSE. We do not know how the alleged “appeal” has gone and we do not know whether any appeal has been lodged or not because Mr David Hoh has held himself and his partner father Mr Frank Hoh INCOMMUNICADO. We just got no response from our many letters that I had published on my blogg.
Judge Zainon binti Mohd. Ali had committed the criminal offence of Malfeasance by approving to respondent Stephen Lim Cheng Ban both (1)an order for security for costs (2) later after the security for costs had been paid Judge Zainon binti Mohd. Ali approved to Stephen Lim the second Order for striking out petition. Just the fact that these two orders were made afte my wife had paid the RM.60,000 is proff that Judge Zainon binti Mohd. Ali has committed the said crime. To cap it all Judge Zainon binti Mohd. Ali FROM SHEER IGNORANCE OF THE LAW PROBABLY DID NOT THAT SHE HAD COMMITTED A CRIMINAL OFFENCE; but tough for Judge Zainon binti Mohd. Ali has no excuse because knowledge of the criminal offence is not required to be proved, bloody IGNORANCE WILL DO.
I had also argued that Malaysia had wasted billions of ringgit to educate the children of Bumiputra, but lacking in vision Malaysian leaders hogged all the scholarships for their own children, while leaving those who do not have UMNO connection out of the loop. Therefore the Malaysians find that their choice of candidates are circmscribed by a clutchful of about 5,000 to 6,000 families. This limited choice also disadvantaged the selection of candidates to the easier academic courses in the arts and consequantly Malaysia does not have a sufficiently large pool of talents in the much needed fields of engineering and science. Here is what the author has to say “ Malaysia has also spent heavily on universities and the promotion of technology but its efforts have been stymied by the country's messy racial politics (including preferential university places for the Malay majority) and by the handing of state contracts and concessions to undeserving government cronies. Both the lack of fair competition between businesses and the failure to widen access to education may have a common underlying cause: that South-East Asian countries remain in the grip of narrow elites.”
The result is that there are very few Malay talents of any kind that will provide leadership that will grow their industries or provide a talent base for the growth of science and scientific innovation that is sweeping the font runner economies of India & China. In Malaysia UMNO leaders live in a bubble dream world of make belief. The incident that really cracked me up is the claim that Malaysia had produced an ASTRONAUGHT; this Malay dentist hitched a ride on the back of a Russian SPACE SHOT at the costs of at least riggit 100 million, because that was how much another SPACE TOURIST, an Iranian computer entrepreneur paid for her ride on another Russian SPACE SHOT. It is ridiculously silly to claim that this dentist is any kind of an ASTRONAUGHT because an astronaught is a SPACE TECHNITIAN and he “drives” the space vehicle and to say that this dentist is a space astronaught is really STRETCHING REALITY TO BREAKING POINT. This phenomena is stated in these terms : “This dilettantism was once summed up damningly by Michael Porter, of Harvard Business School: “These companies don't have strategies, they do deals.” Gerry Ambrose in the Kuala Lumpur office of Aberdeen Asset Management laments that it is indeed hard to find Malaysian companies with “a business plan that will last ten years”. Because even the best-run firms often have boards and shareholder lists dominated by the founding family and their friends, it is hard to believe that their thinking will change.
Hitherto, Malaysian companies have had a remarkable record of picking duds when they buy foreign firms. Laura Ashley, a fashion designer; Costain, a builder; Lec, a fridgemaker; and Agusta, a motorbike-maker: all were bought by Malaysian firms with less than glorious outcomes. This was also described by me in my article as fact.
However, he says that there are hopeful signs there are “…..hopeful sign for South-East Asia's corporate future is that it seems to be getting easier for those outside the closed circle of the politically well-connected to set up new businesses and challenge the incumbents. Mr Fernandes's AirAsia is the prime example. Started only six years ago, the airline now criss-crosses the region with a huge network of low-cost flights. Mr Fernandes, a former music-industry man, is still frantically adding routes: he expects to be allowed to start domestic flights in the Philippines and Vietnam soon. He has started a separate, low-cost, long-haul airline, AirAsiaX, which is flying from Kuala Lumpur to Gold Coast airport in Australia and Hangzhou near Shanghai. Flights to Melbourne, Amritsar and eventually London are on the way. “In other once-coddled industries, too, governments are starting to dismantle monopolies. YTL's Mr Yeoh says there will soon be “no hiding place” for firms trying to live from old-fashioned rent-seeking.
The rise of China and India, with their huge home markets, may mean that it is too late for South-East Asia to become big in manufacturing. “The region already dominates some types of agricultural produce: Thailand and Vietnam are the world's two largest rice exporters, for example. Since the region has so much coastline and so many rivers, there is much scope for expanding fish-farming and seafood production. Thai Union, a giant tuna-packer, is already in BCG's top 100. Vietnam, the region's rising star, has several big seafood firms which, if they can resist the regionwide scourge of diversification, may one day reach similar heights.
But they do seem to be linked to the perseverance of narrow elites and to the countries' sluggishness in overcoming old rivalries and building an integrated regional market. It is already too late for Malaysia to catch up to the regions major players, but at least Malaysia may want to remain a little bit ahead of the wost of them all at the bottom rank of S-E Asia. Malaysia has lagged behind because Malaysia’s economic model is built on the FOUNDATIONS OF EXCLUSION. A System that excludes 27 million to enrich an elite of some 10,000 families has no other way to go but DOWN.

12:47 PM  
Blogger kittykat46 said...

Chinese Assembly Hall showing some gonads for once, ah.

10:25 PM  
Blogger semi-modern said...

You need to play your part or Merdeka Review playing it is part by printing these public statement and distributing them to Kulim Voters or alerting them. That will help a lot. Many people might not see it or may not be aware of it.

12:23 AM  

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